Category Archives: Books

Sarah Waters recommends THE CRIME WRITER

Sarah Waters recommends THE CRIME WRITER

‘Jill Dawson’s The Crime Writer has Patricia Highsmith as its heroine: it’s inspired by the years that the thriller writer spent in Suffolk in the early 1960s, and is fantastically moody and appealingly unhinged – a piece of sophisticated literary ventriloquism that achieves a wonderful blurring of the lines between fact and fantasy.’ Continue reading…

Book of the Week – The Lady

Book of the Week – The Lady

The title of Orange Prize-shortlisted Jill Dawson’s novel (The Crime Writer) should be taken with a pinch of salt: its subject, Patricia Highsmith, considered herself to be a writer not of crime but suspense fiction: less Agatha Christie, more Fyodor Dostoyevsky. Highsmith’s 1960s sojourn in the quiet Suffolk village of Earl Soham provides the inspiration… Continue reading…

Telegraph review of THE CRIME WRITER

Telegraph review of THE CRIME WRITER

Jake Kerridge enjoys a novel that imagines  Patricia Highsmith had dabbled in crime herself Patricia Highsmith died more than 20 years ago, but Jill Dawson’s The Crime Writer is, surprisingly, the first novel to take as its subject that rebarbative, whisky-soaked genius, who liked to take her pet snails to parties in her handbag and… Continue reading…

The Crime Writer – Spectator review

The Crime Writer – Spectator review

Patricia Highsmith was an accretion of oddities — a woman who doted on her pet snails and carried a selection of them in her handbag, who abandoned her native America for a restless life in Europe, and who turned a habitual paranoia into literature. Now, 20 years after her death, her reputation has been substantially… Continue reading…

The Crime Writer – Daily Mail review

The Crime Writer – Daily Mail review

Dawson often draws on real people for inspiration in her novels, and this one is no exception. Here, she takes the fascinating character of the legendary crime novelist Patricia Highsmith as both a subject for biographical scrutiny and the protagonist of an imagined story, in which Highsmith crosses the line between writing about murderers and… Continue reading…